Top 4 Tips to Create An Online Product Training Material

Product knowledge training is essentially aimed at training employees of organizations to share and update useful information about its products, their features and benefits. However, many a times, learners are overwhelmed with the amount of knowledge they need to grasp all at once. Thus, online product training material needs to be customized accordingly so that learners can absorb the required amount of knowledge as well as apply the same practically. Here are some tips that can help you to develop effective online product training courses.

Set the learning goals beforehand

Charting out the learning goals well in advance allows you to create a product training course, which is effective as well as functional. For this purpose, you need to define your target audience at the very onset in order to confirm their requirements. Normally, the target learners of product training course are usually, the sales team, service team or customer service representatives.

However, a course designer needs to know that the training material for a sales team would be different from the one intended for customer care representatives. For example, a salesperson needs to know the value proposition of the product so that they can effectively convey it to the prospective customer. On the contrary, a customer care executive should be aware about troubleshooting techniques so that he can help customers when faced with service issues. The online training program should be able to address these individual learning goals.

Determining how much information is required

Depending on the requirements of the individual group of learners, the training material needs to be tailored. Thus, determining the quantity of information required for catering to a particular group is extremely important. While a sales person might need a particular level of knowledge about products, a service engineer or technician might require an in-depth technical knowledge of the product. Therefore, organizing training material according to the learner’s profile makes it more relevant and productive.

Focus on the motivation levels of learners

Considering the motivational levels of learners is extremely important when designing a course. Unless you know what motivates your target audience to take up a particular course, you won’t be able to provide anything relevant to them. For example, a salesperson is likely to be interested in knowing the benefits of a particular product, while an engineer will be keen on learning about the technical aspects of a particular product. Designing course materials according to multiple choices is likely to trigger interest in joining online training programs.

Create a brief structure for long product line

Many a times, the training course has to deal with long product lines of the company. In such cases, the instructional designers should focus on creating a brief structure that is relevant to a majority of the products. You can furnish information with the help of info-graphics, where you can focus on individual features, benefits, cost and their USP.

Follow these tips to create a product training course that yields value-added results in terms of employee training.

Marketing Your Online Product

What is an online product and how does a person go about marketing one? That is often the question asked by those who are interested in creating digital products and then marketing them on the Internet. Here it will be explored exactly what an online product is and how you can go about marketing them online yourself.

An online product can have so many different meanings. For example, it can refer to any product that is sold on the Internet or it can refer to products that can only be sold online, such as digital products. For the explanation provided here, digital products or those that can only be sold online will be covered. If you’re marketing products that can also be sold offline as well, you can still get some pointers from this information which may be helpful.

An online product or digital product is one that Internet users purchase on the Internet and then download to their computer. There are also digital products that may not require a direct download though, such as an e-book that can be accessed as part of a website, rather than in PDF form. Digital or Internet products can include e-books, music, videos, software, applications or access to things such as training programs.

As for marketing online products, they can be marketed by using several different methods, including:

  • Niche marketing: Marketing by using very specific key phrases and terms on your website for that product only. A niche website doesn’t have any other products or services on it and the goal is to reach a very specific audience.
  • PPC marketing: Signing up for and using PPC (pay per click) advertising programs that are offered by the search engines and other websites. You only pay a fee when an Internet user clicks on the ad and visits your website.
  • Video marketing: Recording a video and uploading it to sites like YouTube to showcase your digital product.
  • Social media marketing: Using websites and services such as Facebook and Twitter to reach out to people and interact with those who may be interested in the online product that you’re offering.
  • Email marketing: Building a list of email addresses by providing a sign up box on your website and social media sites and then sending people who opted in to your email list emails regarding your online product or products.

When it comes down to it, online products can be marketed using the same manners of any other Internet product or service. There are free choices, such as blogging about your online products and then there are methods which can get quite expensive like PPC and flat rate advertising.

The Life Cycle of Online Products

Like many things, products go through a cycle during their effective lifespan. These cycles are regular and predictable. A formal life cycle can help build an understanding of the pattern of stages that a product goes through.

There are many different life cycles each based on the focus and pattern, which the author is observing. In this article, I’m going to share a very detailed nine-step life cycle of an online product.

1. Plan

A good online product begins with a plan. The plan details much of the background information required for the online product. However, only the requirements for the product are provided.

2. Design

In this stage, the requirements are given form. The online product that was described in the plan is defined in detail. A detailed outline of the product is produced.

3. Produce

This stage varies depending on the media of the online product. For example, an eBook is written at this stage. A teleseminar on the other hand may be written but it definitely is presented and recorded.

4. Package or Publish

The online product is still in a rough state at the start of this stage — although it is in fact complete. This stage polishes the product and adds elements that turn it into a professional, salable product. For example, a video will have opening and closing credits added and a cover designed.

5. Generating Traffic

At this stage, the product is available. However, sales are not actually occurring. Instead, traffic must be generated in order to ensure that sales are sufficient to justify the costs so far. This is often referred to as a pre-launch stage although it can occur after the launch.

6. Marketing and Selling

At this stage, the product is available and the traffic has reached a stable point. Sales are reasonably stable. In this stage, the marketing emphasis has switched to finding the right types of traffic, rather than the growth focus of the previous stage.

7. Declining Sales

After a period of time, almost all products begin to experience a decline in sales. This may be because of market saturation or real or perceived obsolescence.

8. Bonus

Finally, the sales have dropped to the point that marketing and sales efforts fail to produce sales. At this point, the product is retired from sales. However, it becomes available for use as a bonus to support the sales of other products.

9. Retirement

Eventually, a product will cease to be of value even as a bonus. At this point, the product will be removed from the products for sale list.