How to Offline Market Online Products

Hello, in this article I will tell you about my first experience with offline marketing online products.

Maybe you already are an online marketer or perhaps you’re interested in becoming one? What you should know anyhow, if you don’t already know this, is that there are a variety of effective ways to promote online products other than sitting inside with your computer posting links on Twitter or Facebook.

I thought it would be interesting to go outside and meet people on the street, in shopping centers or any other random place, and just simply talk to them about being an online marketer. I wasn’t sure how to go about it at first but I finally dared to dive in and embrace the challenge. I’m not sorry! Some people seemed genuinely interested and others probably didn’t even take me seriously at all. One guy was even downright rude, like I was annoying him by breathing his air or something, so you really have to be able to handle all sorts of reactions.

Anyway, the hours literally flew and for the most I had lots of fun talking to people about online marketing and what it’s all about. Surprisingly few knew anything at all about what it is; only 1 out of 20 perhaps had a clue to what I was talking about. So I feel like I have at least spread the word around a bit.

It gave me a challenge to try to explain in a simple fashion to not scare off potential customers with too much information at once. There’s a huge amount of info on the topic so the key is to try to keep it as simple as possible. My goal was and is to spike the interest of them becoming online marketers themselves, since the product I’m promoting in fact is an online marketing training program. So plant the seed and if it grows that’s great, if it doesn’t… well you can’t force it! You’ll just have to improve your skills.

At first it was difficult because I wasn’t sure where to start or exactly what to say, but as I talked to more and more people I felt more relaxed and words started flowing easier after repeating myself 50 times. I had printed out some business cards and flyers on forehand and they came in very handy. I found it a lot easier if I had something to presents while giving my little speech. It also seemed to make people more interested in what I had to say.

By the end of the day I had hung up 5 flyers with tags you can rip off at the bottom, had talked to maybe 50-60 people and handed out lots of business cards. I call that success, and even though perhaps only one or two of those 50-60 people I talked to buy the products, that’s money in the bank and the word is out. People like to talk and may pass the information on to someone else who in fact is interested.

So this was kind of like my test drive just to see if the effort could amount to something. The next place I feel may be a big hit is the University. Lots of students who would love to make some extra cash. Think I’ll give them a hand!

This is only one way of marketing online products offline; In the future I’ll be trying out more ways to “offline market” online products, and perhaps I’ll even get creative and think of some more methods along the way!

Ideas For Online Products

The Five Stages In the Life Cycle of Online Products

Life cycles are an extremely useful concept. Like most models, they help people to visualize the progress of an online product under certain conditions. They help people to predict the effects of decisions within the life cycle of that product.

There are a number of different life cycles. In fact, everyone who has an interest in an online product has some form of life cycle. Learning content creators have their version of a life cycle based on the effort. Accountants have their view of a life cycle based on income. Project Managers often have two. One based on the development cycle and one based on the types of projects needed. And marketers have their view.

In a previous article, I suggested a very complex life cycle. However, in this article I’m going to describe one life cycle of online products as seen by a marketer.

This marketing life cycle consists of five steps.

1. Pre-Launch

The period before the launch of a product is the focus of many other life cycles. But for a marketer, this time is used for two main purposes. The first is preparation of a marketing plan and marketing assets to be used later in the life cycle. However, this period is also used to create a buzz. Frequently this is a very heavy period of marketing as pre-orders are important to recovering the cost of development of the online product. A large pre-order also helps to focus partners on the product so that they continue to support the marketing effort in the next stage.

2. Growth

Once the product is released there will be an initial period where sales grow. While the pre-launch focused on the initial penetration of the market, this stage is more concerned with obtaining a commanding share of the market. This period is often characterized by high marketing spending with respect to profit.

3. Stabilization

In time, the market begins to reach equilibrium. While new competition enters the market, it tends not to disrupt the status quo. This stage is characterized by high profit with limited market spending and a stability in the market share.

4. Decreasing Sales

As time goes by sales begin to decrease. This can be caused by an obsolete product. Or it may be a market-wide phenomena caused by market saturation. Or it may be the result of an alternate innovative market arising. In any case, this stage is often characterized by wild swings in marketing spending. This is the result of increased spending on marketing with little result followed by a demand to reduce spending in order to increase profit. Determining the value of increased marketing spending during this time can be frustrating and frightening.

5. Alternate Use

This is sometimes referred to as retirement. However, I prefer the concept of alternate use with online products. Online products are most often used as bonuses to improve the sales value of other products. Actual retirement is frequently used to adjust the market demand. Online products are also frequently improved and renamed with a version which somewhat eliminates their retirement in this stage. However, regardless of the strategy chosen, this stage is characterized by the withdrawal from sale of the product and the associated suspension of marketing efforts.